Sailor Extraordinaire

Joshua Slocum (1844-1909) was the first man to sail around the world single handedly. He recounted this feat in a book entitled Sailing Alone Around the World which was wildly popular. The critic, Arthur Ransome, wrote that “Boys who do not like this book ought to be drowned at once.” Sadly he set sail on a winter voyage in 1909 and was never heard from again.

Book Hoarder

David Mason, the preeminent rare book dealer in Canada, has just published¬†a memoir of his life in the book trade. It is entitled The Pope’s Book Binder (reflecting on his having helped to bind a book for Pope John XXIII). He has been in the rare book trade for fifty years and has an inventory of 70,000 volumes in his Toronto store. One of his best customers is Alberto Manguel who is a writer, translator and lover of libraries. Manguel has a personal library of 30,000 volumes many of which he has purchsed from Mason.

James Rennell

James Rennell (1742-1830) was a man of many prodigious talents. He was a surveyor, mapmaker, explorer, soldier, writer and oceanographer. He was responsible for the first accurate mapping of India and nearly died in the attempt. His party was attacked by Sanashi Fakirs and he was critically wounded but survived. He feturned to England and published pioneering work on ocean drift. He is buried in Westminster Abbey.

Culinary Improvement

Confused about culinary matters? Then go a great website called Hunter Angler Gardener Cook. It is the creation of a Renaissance man named Hank Shaw. He has had a wide and varied career ranging from line cook, fisherman, hunter and now wild game enthusiast. He has a remarkable series of recipes, techniques and advice on all matters culinary. Give his site a try and then use your knowledge in your own kitchen.

The Butcher Genealogist

Thomas De Voe (1811-1892) was a butcher by trade in New York City and had his business at the Jefferson Market from 1833 until 1872. He was also the author of two books The History of Public Markets (1862) and The Market Assistant (1867). The second title is a compendium of the surprising produce & livestock available in New York City. These included: squirrel, black bear, raccoon, pigeons, green geese, swan, and eels. In addition to these labors he was also the author of the Genealogy of the de Veaux Family in 1885. Quite the well-rounded man!